THE BELGIAN AND ALLIED ARMY CLUBS

BELAAC

 

 

SHORT HISTORY

 

At the end of 1944, Colonel PIRON, commander of the 1st Belgian infantry Brigade,
was looking for some young girls who would be able of operating mobile field canteens.

A dozen of young girls volunteered for the job, and they joined up as civilian volunteers.

The girls even followed the brigade during its second campaign in the Netherlands in 1945.

1945, Occupied Germany. BELAAC mobile canteen.

Due to the success of this initiative, BELAAC was created on July 19 1945.

Among the founders were a representative of the Minister of Defence, the chairman of the Belgian Red Cross,
the countess DE LIMBURG-STIRUM and the countess VAN DER BURCH.

Countess DE LIMBURG-STIRUM, one of the founders of BELAAC.

On October 23 1945 a ministerial circular officially informed the unit commanders of the existence
of the BELAAC and of the possibility of having a club  at their disposal.

56 Clubs were opened from which 29 in Occupied Germany.

The BELAAC was disbanded on July 31 1955.

 

 

FORMATION BADGE AND INSIGNIA

 

FORMATION BADGE

 A white Belgian lion on a sky blue shield, with a sky blue Belgian crown
on a black background above the shield.

 
Formation Badge and Arm Title right arm.   Formation Badge and Arm Title left arm.

ARM TITLES

On the left sleeve a black curved arm title with "BELGIUM" in blue capital letters.

On the right sleeve a black curved arm title with "BELAAC" in blue capital letters.

BELAAC girl with the insignia on her left arm.

BERET BADGE

The Belgian lion was worn on a red background on a black beret.

Belgian BELAAC ladies with General Sir G. I. THOMAS.

 

As far as known no rank insignia were worn.

 

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